NESAH 45th Annual Meeting

Rescheduled for Tuesday, February 21, 2017

NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER OF THE SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS

Cordially invites you to its

45th ANNUAL MEETING

6:30 p.m. Business Meeting followed by a 7:00 p.m. program honoring the career of architectural historian Keith N. Morgan. A scholar of nineteenth and twentieth century American and European architecture, Professor Morgan has taught at Boston University since 1980. He has served as the director of the Preservation Studies Program and of the American and New England Studies Program and as the chairman of the Art History Department on two occasions. He is a former president of the National Society of Architectural Historians. Professor Morgan will present a lecture commemorating the 140th anniversary of the building of Trinity Church (building consecrated on February 9, 1877).

screen-shot-2017-01-31-at-5-24-45-am

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

6:30 p.m. Business Meeting

7:00 p.m. Lecture

Trinity Church, Forum Room, 206 Clarendon Street, Boston, MA 02116

Light refreshments will be served following the lecture.

2016 Annual Meeting

2016 annual meeting
Photo by Ezra Stoker/Esto

NEW ENGLAND SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS

2016 ANNUAL MEETING

Wednesday 10 February 2016

Northeastern University
Behrakis Health Sciences Center Room 310 (3rd floor)
30 Leon Street, Boston, MA
Parking Available in West Parking Garage, Leon Street
6:00pm Business Meeting followed by lecture by
Timothy R. Rohan on his recently published book:

The Architecture of Paul Rudolph

Equally admired and maligned for his remarkable Brutalist buildings, Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) shaped both late modernist architecture and a generation of architects while chairing Yale’s department of architecture from 1958 to 1965. Based on extensive research and unpublished materials, The Architecture of Paul Rudolph (Yale University Press, 2014) is the first in-depth study of the architect, neglected since his postwar zenith.
Author Timothy M. Rohan unearths the ideas that informed Rudolph’s architecture, from his Florida beach houses of the 1940s to his concrete buildings of the 1960s to his lesser-known East Asian skyscrapers of the 1990s. Situating Rudolph within the architectural discourse of his day, Rohan shows how Rudolph countered the perceived monotony of the glass curtain-walled International Style with a dramatically expressive architecture for postwar America, exemplified by his Yale Art and Architecture Building of 1963, famously clad in corrugated concrete.

Timothy M. Rohan is associate professor in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at UMass Amherst. He has written articles for Grey Room, Casabella, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians and other publications. His new research concerns late twentieth-century Manhattan interiors.

Event is co-sponsored by: Northeastern University, School of Architecture, Art + Design Department